Dyslexia Myths & Truths 

Myth

Smart people can't be dyslexic; if you are dyslexic, you can't be very smart.

TRUTH

TRUTH

On the contrary, some of the very brightest boys and girls struggle to read. Dyslexia occurs at all levels of intelligence - from below average to highly gifted. Many gifted people at the top of their fields are dyslexic.

Myth

There are no indications that a child is dyslexic before he/she begins school. 

TRUTH

TRUTH

Since reading is based on spoken language, indicators of possible dyslexia are present before a child enters school. Children with dyslexia often have slightly delayed speech, cannot recognize rhyming words, and have a family history of reading difficulties. See Is it Dyslexia? for more details. Children as young as five years old can be tested for dyslexia by a professional. Early testing allows for earlier intervention which minimizes the difficulties that accompany dyslexia.

Myth

People with dyslexia see and write letters backwards. So if a child does not confuse b/d or p/q, he or she cannot be dyslexic.

TRUTH

TRUTH

​Many children reverse their letters when learning to write, regardless of whether or not they have dyslexia. Reversing letters is not a sure sign of dyslexia; a child can be highly dyslexic and not confuse their letters.
 

Myth

People who are dyslexic are unable to read.

TRUTH

TRUTH

Most commonly, dyslexic children and adults do learn to read, but the problem is the effort required to read. Typical readers of the same ability level become "fluent" readers at an early stage. For a fluent reader, reading is automatic, fast, and pleasurable. In contrast, dyslexic children remain "manual” readers who read slowly and with great effort throughout their lives. Instruction in a  research-based Structured Literacy program, such as Barton Reading and Spelling System, can greatly improve a dyslexic's reading abilities. 

Myth

Dyslexia is a visual problem. 

TRUTH

TRUTH

Dyslexia is a neurological problem, not a visual problem. A dyslexic is born with a brain that is structurally and functionally different from the brain of someone who does not have dyslexia.

Myth

Dyslexia only affect boys.

TRUTH

TRUTH

Both males and females can be dyslexic. In a study published in 1990 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, it was demonstrated that dyslexia affects comparable numbers of boys and girls although more boys are referred by their teachers for evaluation, these referrals appear to reflect the more rambunctious behavior of boys in the classroom.

Myth

If you perform well in school, you can't be dyslexic.

TRUTH

TRUTH

Some dyslexics perform very well in school. These students are highly motivated and work incredibly hard; many have received the necessary accommodations that allowed them to demonstrate their knowledge. Dyslexic students have completed rigorous programs at highly selective schools of higher education.

PHONE  951-595-1212 / ADDRESS 38365 Innovation Ct Unit 905 Murrieta, CA  92563 

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